Mobile learning…what’s the deal?

mLearnCon 2013 is happening right now, and we thought this would be a good time to write about some related topics:

Mobile learning. M-learning. Native apps. Tablets. Smart phones. Offline e-learning. HTML 5.

These are all terms that we’ve been hearing a lot about in the e-learning community, but where do we really stand with all of these different things, especially when talking about trackable and standards-conformant learning?

Many of our customers have a large catalog of SCORM content, and some of them have particular needs like being able to do offline learning or delivering their content via a native mobile app.

In the past, this had only been done by a few people and in limited contexts, but about six months ago we figured out a really good way to make it work. This is a huge development in the world of SCORM. You can learn more about how it works here, or just just email or give us a call. We’d love to chat up some mobile/offline SCORM with you.

Another option, and a more forward-thinking, future-proof alternative, is to use the Tin Can API. With Tin Can, you just enable your learning content/activities to send Tin Can statements to any LRS (or multiple LRSs). Configure your app to store the statements locally, and then send them when a network connection is present.

Tin Can API for Mobile Learning

Almost 40% of exhibitors at mLearnCon 2013 have adopted the Tin Can API, which has only been formally released as 1.0 since late April of this year. That’s pretty amazing, isn’t it?

You can even use Tin Can to track things like games and location-based activities, both of which are commonplace on mobile devices.

If you happen to be at mLearnCon 2013, right now, this is the perfect opportunity for you to come by and talk about mobile SCORM and the Tin Can API with us. Just go find Andy and/or Tammy in booth 108, and they should be able to answer any questions that you have. If you’re not at the conference, send an email to info@scorm.com or give us a ring.

You might be tired of seeing this line, but we love saying it (and we mean it) — we love talking to people about this stuff!
 


  • Azmatullah

    Any way should be exist to convert scorm into html5, so we can show scorm content in native mobile apps.